Category Archives: Monologues

New Novel Release: “Reparations Core” by Philip Wyeth

This is Philip Wyeth here to announce the publication of my new novel, “Reparations Core.” This is my fourth book, and the third installment in the “Reparations” series.

So today, I thought I would discuss the scope of these books, since they tap into a pretty heavy concept. Discussion about Reparations for slavery seems to be more and more in the news lately, to the point that it might actually be one of the Democrat Party’s major issues in 2020.

My series takes place in the year 2028, with the premise being that in 2024 a Chinese-American woman is elected president on a Reparations ticket. In order to determine who owes or gets paid what, a centralized supercomputer is set up to scan and aggregate all of humanity’s collected documents.

Here is one of the main thrusts established in the first book of this series, “Reparations USA.” That a surveillance state will spring out of the Left’s restitution-for-colonialism crusade. And how can anyone control where that kind of scrutiny will stop?

So that first book is very much a frantic world-building exercise, but at the same time is more than just some reactionary white apology. How so? First, some of the real-world complexities and nuances are explored through the arc of two of my minority characters.

And then—as good sci-fi often strives for—I offer a broader, more forward-thinking vision through a new religion called Modestianity. This group is not quite Luddite or Amish, but they do see the pitfalls of embracing all forms of new technology, without at least assessing the pros and cons along the way.

In the second book, “Reparations Mind,” I really dig into the searching, philosophical side of this religion, as a means to ask deep questions that apply to us all today. For example, how do we retain our human dignity when the camera’s amoral eye watches us with far less compassion than any God might?

This book also dives deeper into what exactly causes us to believe what we do. For how many years has the education system been more about indoctrinating an army of sleeper-cell change agents, than simply helping children develop independent, critical thinking skills?

The broader series plot centers around the 2028 election. Everything seemed to have been going well for the president, but in early October a hacker group takes over the Reparations supercomputer, and all of a sudden a sense of doubt sweeps across the country.

People start to ask, is this Reparations program really working? Have we opened a Pandora’s Box of retribution that will paralyze society, and risk stopping all progress as mankind obsessively looks over its shoulder? Book two ends on this cliffhanger of uncertainty, for the cast as well as the country.

And without revealing the election results, I’ll say that the new release, “Reparations Core,” picks right back up again in the lame-duck months of November and December. And if book two was a heavy, deep dive of self-discovery for the characters, then this one reads more like a slow burn, political thriller.

I kept the chapters shorter and moving along quickly, building readers up to major events both in the middle and at the end. We see the cast come face to face with previously unknown—and sometimes unpleasant—aspects of themselves when forced to make difficult choices under pressure.

And I think that’s why this trilogy might appeal to people who at first bristle at the thought of reading books about Reparations for slavery. Because the series is character driven, and they’re all treated fairly as we dig deep into questions of identity when living under the shadow of major ideological movements. These novels are very much a mirror of life today, as well as satirically imagining what might happen over the next decade.

Is accounting for the sins of the past worth the risk of unleashing a tornado of vengeance that might never stop? Is there a specific amount of concession or capitulation that would satisfy old grievances? And if not, are you prepared for the consequences of the revolt if white guilt gave way to… white survivalism or white existentialism?

Because at the end of the day, these books are an act of faith on my part. I’m a white guy whose ancestors fought in the American Revolution, and on both sides of the Civil War. But I moved from my home state of Virginia out to Los Angeles—I’m a creator and a business starter. The thousand or more hours I spent writing these books during the past two years could have been spent just making money, instead of racking my brain about how to dramatize the major issues facing us all. I could have written young adult fiction, urban fantasy, or the latest and most preposterous write-to-market trend, reverse harem.

But I sensed a spiritual sickness and a political rift that could very well usher in Balkanization here in America—if not a second civil war. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again now—despite the twitching urges of our dormant bloodlust, we do not actually want something like that to happen.

I don’t know if the momentum toward conflict can be stopped, and here’s another question: would it really be called a “civil war” when nearly a quarter of the population is either foreign-born or a first-generation immigrant?

But maybe that’s a can of worms for another day, or another book. For now, I offer up “Reparations USA,” “Reparations Mind,” and “Reparations Core.” A series that’s full of heart, humor, insights, unexpected twists, and enough futuristic flavors to satisfy fans of science fiction and political thrillers alike.

You can find these books on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Kobo, iTunes, and Smashwords. Signed paperbacks are also available for purchase on my website, philipwyeth.com.

And just a heads-up: I’ve got a brand new sci-fi series in the works that I’m very excited about. I hope to release the first installment of that in a few months. Subscribe to this channel, or follow me on Twitter or Instagram for updates. Thanks very much for listening.

This video can also be watched on the following platforms:
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DTube (via Steemit): https://d.tube/#!/v/philipwyeth/wfsr1y2m
Minds: https://www.minds.com/newsfeed/https://www.minds.com/newsfeed/958582660014333952

Video was originally uploaded on March 29, 2019.

The Jussie Smollett Hoax is the New Ice Bucket Challenge

This is Philip Wyeth. Pretty ecstatic right now that the Jussie Smollett hate crime hoax story’s falling apart. Why? Because on the night of the alleged attack, I wrote this on Twitter in response to the claim that the people who attacked him said, “This is MAGA country!”

I wrote, “This is Egg-On-Your-Face country.” Millions of credulous fools allowing themselves to be whipped into a Pavlovian frenzy by media manipulators. But ‘the feels’ of virtue signaling are
too good to resist.”

Now here we are, two, three weeks later, and it’s all falling apart in outrageous fashion. Every day some new ridiculous detail is coming out. Will this guy take the fall? Will he go to prison? Or will it just be one of those things where in the media, “He needs to take some time for himself, he needs to go to rehab”?

And there would be no consequences for what? Essentially slandering white people, Republicans, Trump supporters.

But what gets me about this whole Smollett thing is it reminds me of the Ice Bucket Challenge a few years ago. Who had the courage to resist doing that stupid shit? You know, it took on a life of its own, and so every friend, every co-worker, every relative kept retweeting or forwarding the Facebook videos of them taking it, and “I challenge you.”

And this time it was the celebrities, the politicians, the media pouncing on this story dujor about some sort of hate crime. How many of these high-profile people are now gonna post, “Hey, I was wrong. I had the Fox Mulder reaction from X-Files. I want to believe.”

They all wanted to believe that this crime was true because it allowed them to believe in their
narrative, and then do some sort of public display of… reconciliation, lecturing, self-righteousness about, “We need to have that conversation.”

But now that it’s all falling apart and proving to be a lie… No, we need to have this conversation, where jerks like me, assholes like me who called it out—because my spidey sense was correct weeks ago—I was the one who was right.

Yeah, I’m a straight white guy who called bullshit on it the day of, while all of you got to pat each other on the back for weeks because you’re part of this self-righteous, progressive, forward-thinking—allegedly—movement. When in truth it was all a lie.

How many other hate hoaxes have been a lie since the 2016 election? Remember the Muslim girl who said that guys in MAGA hats ripped off her hijab? Turns out she was late for her curfew and didn’t want to get her dad mad. And when she went into court a few days later, her head had been shaved by her father for lying to him! Where were you calling him out for his toxic masculinity?

We’re not even two months into the year and we’ve had a handful of these events that, on the surface were one thing, which made straight white males for the most part look bad—and then when the real story came out, it was anything but us who did it. When will you learn? Or because you’re part of this axis of the education, media, entertainment matrix you never face consequences for your incorrect assumptions. Your slanders, your lies.

How much money has the Chicago Police Department wasted that could have been spent on tracking down real criminals, chasing down this lie? How many times are you allowed to bear false witness against your political enemies before you face real-life consequences, and not just a retraction or a correction on page 28 of the newspaper?

And all of the websites like TMZ, New York Times, Good Morning America on TV, who made money on this story, promoting it, not doing their due diligence on the facts. Do you have to return that money, or maybe donate it to a charity in the same way that a celebrity or politician gets in trouble has to essentially give money to some organization that is tangentially related to the party they aggrieved?

I think at the root of this we can track down conformity as being one of the worst afflictions of modern American life. And it’s particularly evident among the political Left, because they’re in this arms race of going along to get along.

I remember when I was at a cigar shop last year and there was one man I was talking to, probably around my age, late thirties, smart guy, a lawyer. And he was saying something to the effect of, “change equals progress.”

And I disagree, and here’s two examples why. Let’s say you lose your arm in a car accident. That is a change, but that is not progress. You find out you have a tumor on your arm. Again, that is a change but that is not progress.

My guess is that even if Jussie Smollett did some kind of perp walk press conference, like Tiger Woods did years ago, the true believers who tweeted about this, wrote articles about it, held rallies about it… They just will not be able to back down and let it go. They are too invested in this narrative.

You just can’t reason with people or so bought into a certain ideology, narrative, group hug mentality that they are not capable of healthy skepticism, common sense, or just waiting to see how things play out. Because the rewards are instant in the Twitter, Instagram, Facebook world.

The bottom line is that the people who are skeptical and had to hold out, hold the line for the past few weeks and are now proven right tonight—all you’ve done is reduced the level of patience or pity we would have for such stories.

“The Boy Who Cried Wolf” is a fable that has stood the test of time for a reason. And it’s now not just the boy who cried wolf, because we can’t assume his gender! But it’s basically an ideology that has cried wolf, a mob that has cried wolf.

And I just think that if you keep trying to pull these things over the next couple of years, you’re taking us to the breaking point. And you really don’t want to see what happens when we get that glaze over our eyes and we just don’t care anymore what you think.

This video can also be watched on the following platforms:
Bitchute: https://www.bitchute.com/video/XslMIj4rJ2A
Minds: https://www.minds.com/newsfeed/943738953613115392
Brighteon: https://www.brighteon.com/6003079081001
DTube (via Steemit): https://d.tube/#!/v/philipwyeth/hkoucm3y

Video was originally uploaded on February 16, 2019.

Bridging the Gap Between Accomplishment and Recognition

This is Philip Wyeth, author of Reparations USA, Reparations Mind, and Chasing the Best Days.

Right now I and my circle of close friends are all turning forty, one by one. A thought occurred to me recently as I reflected back on the eighteen years since I packed up my car and drove across the country, just weeks after graduating college.

All of us who came to Los Angeles to make our mark, we were armed with dreams and ambition. That was our fuel. It was all that we had to offer.

But now, as we enter near middle-age, those of us that are still fighting the good fight out here, we need to reassess and find something new to sustain us. Why?

Because now we are all accomplished, but maybe still haven’t found the recognition that we hoped or expected would come with this “proof of competency,” as it’s sometimes called.

For myself, I’ve started several businesses, one of which we had to shut down, but another I actually sold last year. I’ve written three novels, but none of them have gone anywhere so far.

The same up-and-down story goes for my friends, who have worked in the entertainment industry as producers, editors, camera crew, and sound designers on shows and movies that you’ve all seen. They’ve made some money, get steady or semi-regular gigs, and are building up a nice body of work over the course of their careers.

But I was talking about this main idea of sustenance recently with an old acquaintance who I reconnected with by chance, and he has actually won several Emmys, so his reaction told me I was on the right track. Because even he, with bona fide awards to his name, he still has that original strain of insatiable hunger which first drove him to leave home and chase the California Dream.

So no matter what age of a man you are… twenty, forty, sixty… digging into this question can help us all. How do you bridge the gap between accomplishment and recognition?

First, understand that public acclaim may never come. Especially if you’re not “writing to market,” as many self-published authors do in order to capitalize on trends. But then you have to ask yourself, why am I doing any of these things at all? Out of your own passion, to gain skills and experience, or to get praise?

Another profound anecdote comes from a longtime friend who recently did what I had once done—namely, leave Los Angeles to try to do normal things—only to have those plans blow up in your face.

He was working a job where he engaged with the public on a daily basis, and befriended a customer who personality-wise was essentially his doppelganger. This man had a high-powered job, a mansion, money, and a fiance who kept him on the straight and narrow. But he too, like my friend, had a passion for music—and one day it came up in conversation that if he had the time, all the man wanted to do was be in the studio recording songs.

This was the moment that washed away all of the shocking disappointment that my friend had been through. He later moved back to LA having cut his losses in every sense of the word, and resumed his music career with renewed energy and purpose.

I don’t know how relatable this next flavor is for people, but there’s something about giving up your life in California—your friends, the weather, the electric energy of free-flowing ambition that’s all around you—but to then go somewhere else, and have that compromise you made with the gods just completely fall apart… You feel like a fool, and you bang your head against the wall asking why you can’t seem to get ahead.

But sometimes you need those terrible defeats to give you the backbone to see future projects to the finish line—to earn those high-stakes accomplishments when other people might falter and quit.

So maybe attitude is part of the new fuel to help bridge these gaps in life. Gratitude, patience, and maybe being more selective with what projects you choose to work on. Because we’re not eighteen anymore, and the old hard drive inside our skull has been spinning for a long time…

Also recognize that life isn’t perfect or easy for anyone. You take a step forward, get knocked down, try again, and at the end of it all hopefully someone will come along and appreciate the work you left in your wake. Then you feel the relief of knowing that you don’t need to “change the world,” as everyone has been indoctrinated to believe for the past two generations.

How many old movies or albums waited decades for you to stumble across them? Maybe you too are fated not to have a bestselling novel, but many years from now it will find its audience.

Therefore, we all need to find something else to sustain us, so that in case we do get rewarded after the fact, we don’t respond with tragic bitterness like Jean Rhys, author of Wide Sargasso Sea, who lamented, “It has come too late.”

Finding that sort of grace is easier said than done, of course. The delirium I fall into when finishing a book is a total obsession, where every waking hour is spent thinking, and editing, and drinking too many beers… Because something happens in the final week or so, when it’s all there but still so many small details need tending to. Then I think—I know—that this is gonna be the one that pushes me out of obscurity into fame, riches, you name it.

This manic sprint in itself is actually a kind of bridge or fuel. But then, as any creative person will tell you, next comes that pin drop of silence after you complete the project. No matter how many times it happens, that choking feeling never gets old. So now you’re exhausted, just throwing money out there trying to will the thing into success.

But even that process is okay, and maybe necessary. More little defeats, still you’re always learning—because behind the body of work we’re all building, there’s the auxiliary stuff like graphic design or marketing that we have to learn in this indie era.

Perspective is another key tool to help get you through. A few years ago I read Barbara Tuchman’s history of the Fourteenth Century called A Distant Mirror, and talk about having your expectations smashed! Guys would wrangle together a small army, cross the English Channel with dreams of plunder, only to lose battles or get throttled by awful weather—and then, when they finally got home, found out that all their children died of bubonic plague!

All of a sudden not getting that one job doesn’t sting so much. You’ve still got a lot, a lot going for you, and you’re still in the fight.

So, I know that today’s political climate means we’re all slowly being driven insane, but to push back against that demoralizing trend, let’s commit as individuals to move our own agendas forward in 2019. Creativity, fitness, profit, companionship, whatever it is. Don’t let doubt, the news, past failure, manipulators, or outside distractions derail you.

Just work toward racking up a long list of accomplishments as monthly mile markers to look back upon. Because if all you want is praise right out the gate with no effort involved, just take a selfie and post that on social media somewhere.

Thanks for listening. Now get to it.

This video can also be watched on the following platforms:
Bitchute: https://www.bitchute.com/video/3XgzIHXQGUI
Minds: https://www.minds.com/newsfeed/941825432065560576
Brighteon: https://www.brighteon.com/6000985083001
DTube (via Steemit): https://d.tube/#!/v/philipwyeth/04n7zv7e

Video was originally uploaded on February 11, 2019.

No Safe Headspace in the Melting Pot

This is Philip Wyeth, author of “Chasing the Best Days,” “Reparations USA,” and “Reparations Mind.”

Here at the car dealership where my truck is being repaired, the waiting area is filled with foreign-born people all speaking in their native tongue. One wonders at the infrastructure that was put in place to bombard Los Angeles, and most metropolitan areas it seems, with all these incongruous people.

Back in my home state of Virginia 3000 miles away, the never-ending saga of white/black race relations plays out its latest ineffectual act. It’s got all the platitudes and pandering and righteous posturing we’ve seen before, but which get everyone nowhere—meanwhile another million fresh arrivals to our country, who have no skin in this came, merrily put down their own roots.

Which makes me ask, if any alliance is to be made among heritage white and black Americans, is it a reactionary response to being thrown under the bus by our government, which allowed the so-called melting pot to be overwhelmed by too many new ingredients and random spices?

And if the race hustlers, hate-crime hoaxers, and self-flagellating Leftists won’t even allow us to notice this demographic change happening under our feet, then I suspect that the next reaction will be to channel our yearning need for meaning into a reluctant shedding of our American identity, and in its place return to being European and African.

Any such trend toward ancestral awareness, or even allegiance, would fall firmly at the feet of both government and business. It’s galling to think how casually their short-sighted materialism enabled them to sell out our country’s soul in order to accommodate millions of other nations’ citizens. Now after weathering endless wars, economic collapses, and a mass media propaganda machine that seeks to demoralize us, we Americans are exhausted and fighting for scraps here in this lowest-common-denominator nightmare of subsistence click-bait farming.

We’re so stunted and scatterbrained to the point that maybe there won’t be many more great inventions. No more great striving to create insightful or uplifting art. And certainly no taking inspiration from the great deeds of the past. Why? Because our ancestors didn’t do everything perfectly every time everywhere.

Instead street tacos are elevated to the level of cuisine on Yelp. Sports have lost their status as a “safe space” away from politics. And before judging someone by the content of their character, you must also take into consideration their sob story, or the concavity of their crotch.

The spirit of what made America functionally great—striving for excellence, merit, lofty goals—is being crushed and extinguished in favor of creating a docile monochrome population that sits and shops rather than scales mountains. Zombies who use technology not to further unlock nature’s secrets, but to indulge the Seven Deadly Sins—and sprinkle a little self-entitled grievance on top for good measure.

Picture a small device in your house, such as a coffee maker or electric toothbrush. Think about all the micro-innovations that went into the process of creating the model you purchased. Countless hours spent testing and tweaking the components, all adding to the large repository of knowledge that is later applied to an improved version or another new product altogether.

This is what we in America perfected in the post-WWII boom years—and now risk just throwing away because, what? We’ve saturated the world with technology and home goods, so now the next great messianic dream is to end all conflict and perceived inequity by merging all races into one pigment?

But that’s not how it will play out. Already this new Democrat freshman class is showing the plan: that we will always have to look at each and every thing through the prism of race, class, religion, and ethnic homeland. Like a jeweler holding up his loop to inspect a diamond’s features and noting its flaws, now we too will look at the new Oral-B rotating head electric toothbrush and demand to know: how many women of color were on the team that crafted the motor?

Because we are not free to look up or forward anymore. The Kurt Vonnegut story “Harrison Bergeron,” with its Handicapper General making everyone equal, has become a mental reality.

Our imported problems like Ilhan Omar are here to bite clean through our ankles, rather than fix the countries their own families ran away from. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is the vanguard of people who run their mouths to beat an opponent into submission to get what they want, rather than doing the work of quiet introspection that envisions how to solve the problem of morphing clunky DOS-prompt computers into the elegant, handheld smartphones we use today.

So the fork in the road isn’t just about skin color or gender. It’s about having the courage to stand up to people who want to hold a society hostage. Because as we’ve seen especially in the past month, no amount of capitulation or concessions to the Left-wing mob is ever enough. Whether you never opened your mouth but wore the wrong hat, or spent a political career pandering to them, one day that locust swarm will surely come for you.

To keep our self-respect and finally defeat them, from now on just say to them over and over again: no, no… no!

This video can also be watched on the following platforms:
Bitchute: https://www.bitchute.com/video/48bEpa6rdmI
Minds: https://www.minds.com/newsfeed/939608353334906880
Brighteon: https://www.brighteon.com/5998847431001
DTube (via Steemit): https://d.tube/#!/v/philipwyeth/e5sgnici

Video was originally uploaded on February 5, 2019.

America, 2019: From Madness to Forgiveness?

This is Philip Wyeth. Since the election I’ve been thinking that we’ve officially ended the 2015-18 phase—a time which I would say was characterized by madness—and now we’ve landed someplace else.

What will define it, I do not know. But I’d like to propose that it could be a time of forgiveness. In my heart I’m not sure we can expect such an outcome—and even if I’m as guilty as everyone else in frothing at the mouth from time to time—I’m writing this monologue in the good faith that many of us are not ready to throw in the towel regarding civility.

Because while I certainly am interested in how some of the macro political trends will play out—such as identity politics being used as a wedge within the Democrat party’s intergenerational and interracial struggles—I feel the need to parlay my sense of powerlessness and overwhelm into making small moves within the sphere of my own life.

For all of us, there are only so many belief-affirming anecdotes or exasperating news stories before the brain overheats. Maybe consuming information in the internet age mirrors the parable “How Much Land Does a Man Need?” And in our case, the result is not physical death but mental paralysis, rage, and despair.

So the thrust of my argument here is that, after so many of us have done or said many ridiculous things over the past few years, maybe we’re due for some sort of spiritual jubilee. Pressing a hard stop right now, before things really get out of hand.

Because a deep malaise has been growing in us for a long time, and if it boils over beyond the occasional street rumble or lone-nut shooting into open combat that doesn’t stop—we may lose our entire country.

I’ve seen people on opposite sides of the political spectrum make righteous claims about the slaughters that could unfold. Hell, I’ve speculated about a second civil war on this channel before. Maybe such a clash is inevitable due to history’s cyclical nature, but as we recently marked the hundredth anniversary of the World War One armistice, we really should absorb how war is less about a soldier’s battlefield glory, and more about destroying the existing order and demoralizing everyday people.

The rhetoric I’ve seen on both sides is getting sharper, less nuanced—pushing us closer to the precipice of a major historical event we might all regret. So I ask, can we turn our frustration into forgiveness? Is there even any common ground left to stand on? Because spending another two years before the next election lobbing talking points back and forth at each other is no way to live.

I’d rather turn off the phone altogether and reconnect with my friends and family on however basic a level that’s required. Craft beer, sports, hiking, music—whatever restores a sense of enjoyment to life, so that we’re not at each other’s throats trying to impose our political will.

That’s about all I’ve got on this concept right now. Let me know your thoughts in the comment section. Are we too far gone? Is it a case of, “I will, but you go first”? Or could we perhaps use this tool of the internet to not destroy us, but actually do what it was touted as being capable of—bridging the divide between miscommunication and misunderstanding?

Thanks for listening. My third novel “Chasing the Best Days” will be free to download on Amazon this Wednesday through Friday over the holiday. Link is in the description box. I hope everybody has a safe and fun Thanksgiving.

This video can also be watched on the following platforms:
Bitchute: https://www.bitchute.com/video/FbL38RUC3gw
Minds: https://www.minds.com/newsfeed/911103323372822528
Brighteon: https://www.brighteon.com/5968799483001
DTube (via Steemit): https://d.tube/#!/v/philipwyeth/xb9gt3i1

Video was originally uploaded on November 18, 2018.

Book Excerpt: Reflections on Baseball’s Deep Meaning

This is Philip Wyeth. I had the opportunity to attend two World Series games this past month, one in Boston and one in Los Angeles. So I thought what I would do here was share some of the footage I took at both games, as well as read an excerpt from my new novel, “Chasing the Best Days.”

In this chapter my main character Greg has invited his older son Peter to attend an Angels baseball game, and then later he thinks to himself about what the game of baseball meant to him. …

Greg remembered how on summer weekends when he had custody of the boys, Peter would take the rubber-banded stack of baseball cards he’d brought over and arrange them on the floor in front of the TV. All the Angels players plus the other superstars from around the league he liked.

The boy would flip a card over and recite an Angel batter’s stats, then try to predict which base he would most likely end up on if he got a hit. Even back then, the kid was thinking on a higher level. No wonder he’s working in tech.

Greg had collected baseball cards in his day too. Mid-to-late seventies. Lots of great ball players with real personality back then. Mike Schmidt. George Brett. Nolan Ryan. And the guys with classic nicknames too. Goose. Yaz. Catfish.

It was a nice little collection. Stored in a couple of shoe boxes he kept under the bed. Nothing fancy like the binders or hard plastic cases that had come into favor in later years. Baseball cards weren’t an investment back then—you engaged with them. Lived and breathed with them. So what if you creased a corner holding onto Dale Murphy’s card while hoping he got a home run?

And that’s why Greg liked how Peter made use of his own cards. Wore them out, got them dirty, left them on the floor in a big square pattern—before being trampled by Nick in one of his wild moments—as if there was something about life that Peter would absorb from the corny smiles and action shots on the glossy front side.

But it wasn’t just the baseball cards themselves, Greg was now coming to see. It was all aspects of the game that made it so captivating. The deliberate pacing. The nuanced rules and your own understanding of them. You could get real insight into another man based on how he saw the game, as if it were a reflection of his own intelligence and worldview.

Baseball was a game that taught boys about the boundaries of life—how going sideways earned you nothing, but soaring forward over the wall was what brought you the glory. There was teamwork, strategy, and those moments when it was you alone versus the pitcher—each of you grappling with your thoughts during the showdown.

And then one day sometime during adolescence, your focus shifted away from this game that was challenging but always made so much sense, and instead you began chasing girls. An endless riddle that defied logic because the rules changed at random. Where wins seemed like flukes you had stumbled into rather than achieved, and which never carried over to the next play.

Even if you kept watching baseball during all these years caught up in the business of life—school, hobbies, family, work—you never watched the game with the same simple intimacy as when you were an innocent boy. But maybe it waited for you to come around again, leaving a door open to reconnect when you were older, calmer, done with distractions, and had… if not satisfied your desires, at least gone beyond them, because you were finally able to set greed and lust aside.

Then your mind could really take in this chess match out on the diamond. Even now in middle age, Greg saw how it could be an important bookend on a man’s life. Returning to a place well worn by your own feet decades ago, when they were much smaller and without the callouses of so many miles. Embracing the calm flow of America’s pastime after a life spent in the trenches.

You had participated. You dove in and battled the sharks. You made the charge over the top! It was of no importance that you didn’t get rich or famous—or even maintain an intact home, apparently. What mattered was that you played and left it all out on the field, including your intestines as it sometimes felt like after the worst defeats.

Maybe baseball and golf, sports so dependent on rules and played as a process rather than on the clock, maybe these were the great soothing elixirs for an aging man’s mind. An effervescent dreamland, a bulwark against chaos, a wide open space in nature where generations of men could gather in safety.

To teach fundamental skills. Tell stories of when I played the game. To marvel at the youngsters bounding around the field—their joys so pure and simple, their tears heartfelt but not weighed down by any of the real grief that would come later.

Greg thanked God that he had been there for Peter and Nick’s practices and games. As cruel as the whole arc of those years had been, at least he wasn’t denied being allowed to teach the boys how to throw a proper curveball. He had been there when each of them got their first hole-in-one too. …

It didn’t matter when your plans turned to nothing. Or that you had lived in denial chasing the dream for far too long. Because what you got instead—that wisdom beyond words—didn’t come with championships, it couldn’t be purchased, and no man could pretend his way into possessing it.

You had to be wounded again and again to receive it. Get back up and charge onward—over here, and now there—and die once more. The only way out was indeed through—as your blood and tears seeped down into the soil of life, your bright eyes filling with despair in the shell-shock of a thousand different defeats.

Which was maybe why old men saw ball fields as holy ground. The place where memories of their own distant wins and losses merged with those of the generations that came after. To know that thousands of boys also tried to steal the very same second base that you had—this was profoundly satisfying. …

Thanks for listening. You can hear all of my monologues at philipwyeth.com, and you can purchase the new book “Chasing the Best Days” exclusive to Amazon. And if you’re a Kindle Unlimited subscriber, you can read the e-book for free.

UPDATE: As of January 2019, the e-book is also available from the following stores:
Barnes & Noble: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/chasing-the-best-days-philip-wyeth/1130240902
Kobo: https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/chasing-the-best-days

This video can also be watched on the following platforms:
Bitchute: https://www.bitchute.com/video/tkZqpsspiyKM
Minds: https://www.minds.com/newsfeed/906396708834787328
Brighteon: https://www.brighteon.com/5858077124001
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PhilipWyethWriter/videos/305351410053781/
DTube (via Steemit): https://d.tube/#!/v/philipwyeth/hgss7g9u

Video was originally uploaded on November 5, 2018.

Monologue Announcing My New Novel “Chasing the Best Days”

This is Philip Wyeth. No monologue today because I’m here to announce the publication of my new third novel, “Chasing the Best Days.”

This one is much different from my other two books, which are dystopian, political, high-concept. This one is much more down-to-earth and relatable. It follows a divorced middle-aged man who has just enough money at the end of each month to afford a budget country club here in Los Angeles.

And you follow him on the course, dealing with his sons, frustration at work, trying to scheme a new career change in the middle of his life, dealing with the ex-wife, and his much younger girlfriend.

So a few things I wanted to tap into with this book were: One, my love of golf. Two, talking about the plight of the divorced American man, which i think is an underserved audience. As well as tapping into, in a comical way, some of the changes that are happening in our society so fast right now. And it’s almost like a lot of people are trying to hide away, almost in the style of “The Masque of the Red Death” by Edgar Allan Poe.

That’s under the surface. The book itself is fast moving, lots of great dialogue, lots of fun characters. And I definitely think there’s room for this series to grow.

So right now the book “Chasing the Best Days” is exclusive to Amazon, so if you’re a Kindle unlimited subscriber you can read the e-book for free. Everybody else can buy the e-book or paperback on Amazon.

And if you like it, please post a review so that’ll encourage me to write more books in the series, grow the character out. I would love for this thing to actually turn into a TV show. I think it’d be a lot of fun to have a show on the golf course, for fans of “Caddyshack,” “Tin Cup,” “Happy Gilmore,” or just watching the PGA Tour.

So I’m very excited about this, it was a year ago I started the project, and I’ve been chipping away—no pun intended—in the last four months I really buckled down to crank this thing out.

So again, visit my website PhillipWyeth.com, there are links to the book in the description section here as well. And I’m gonna take a small vacation next week, and then I’m back at the grindstone for more writing. Thanks!

“Chasing the Best Days” is available on Amazon as an e-book and paperback:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07JF5ZN98/

The e-book is also available from:
Barnes & Noble: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/chasing-the-best-days-philip-wyeth/1130240902
Kobo: https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/chasing-the-best-days

This video can also be watched on the following platforms:
Bitchute: https://www.bitchute.com/video/3QxmBuHEQDYr
Minds: https://www.minds.com/newsfeed/900463455186485248
Brighteon: https://www.brighteon.com/5851354693001
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PhilipWyethWriter/videos/182892975963384/
DTube (via Steemit): https://d.tube/#!/v/philipwyeth/rio68l7x

Video was originally uploaded on October 20, 2018.

Cosmopolitan Balkanization in the Savvy Smartphone Age

All right YouTube, let’s do a little “Phil by the Dashboard Light .” Tip of the cap to Alex, I hope you don’t hate me for that one.

But I had an idea this morning called “Cosmo-Balkanization,” which I think is happening or going to happen in this country soon. And the thought is this: So with the likes of Ocasio-Cortez being touted as the new face of the Democratic party… You know, Hispanic immigrant or child of immigrants, supplanting old white male Democrat politicians, that’s going to be the future, they say.

But I think it’s going to be further than that, because of some anecdotes and experiences I’ve got to relate encountering immigrants or children of immigrants here in Los Angeles.

The first one is a Ukrainian woman that I met over the summer. Has an American boyfriend but she’s from the Ukraine, and we were out drinking, talking, getting to know each other, and I guess later in the evening the topic of immigration came up, and my thoughts were we need to slow it down, potentially go back to a 1924, “let’s close the borders down for a while, there’s just too many new people here.”

And I think the latest news story saying that sixty million people don’t speak English at home, that’s not a recipe for a, you know, if not homogeneous, sort of country on the same page with itself. So I told her, yeah, I think we should slow it down.

And herself, only coming here recently, disagreed with that. And one of her points was the fact that because I came from the East Coast, I’m from the DC area, but now I live in California. And because I did that, people should be able to come here too. And I had to explain, well no, because I’m moving within the borders of my own country. I’m not going to Canada. I’m not going to Chile. So what I sensed from her was a sense of entitlement, that she should be here, everyone should be here, everyone should go where they want to go.

And in theory that’s a nice concept, this migration notion that everyone gets to wander around. But there’s simply a capacity for… logistical capacities for being able to stay somewhere. Toilets, furnishings, plumbing capacity, sewage systems, food… trucking in the food. All this stuff, no one thinks about that stuff.

And in fact about a year ago or so I had an Uber driver, I’m not sure where he was from, but he was Jewish and there was some sort of foreign, slight foreign tongue to him. And we were talking about stuff and the concept of migrants, immigration came up, and again, what’s the capacity? When do we shut it off? And his thoughts were, well, if you have the room, the space, or the extra money, the extra food, just let ’em in. And again, should that really be the threshold? “Oh well, I have $5 in my pocket. I have to give this to somebody else now.”

No consideration for the fact of what if I’m saving up for a new truck for work? Or I’m saving up for a gift for my child? No, it’s if you have this dollar now you have to give it to somebody else who’s less fortunate or shows up saying they need it. And that is no way to long-term run a society or a family or a business, because that doesn’t, that’s so short-sighted, doesn’t think about the consequences. And if it’s simply a matter of heartstrings, sad images, “I need,” nothing will ever progress with great leaps forward, of inventions, breakthroughs, art.

You know, if someone’s going to be a great violinist, a classical composer, that doesn’t happen overnight. They need a “safe space,” if you will, for many years. To have the quiet space physically so that their mind and body can work together to to learn the instrument and learn the history and to become a great player.

So stepping back to what I was saying earlier about entitlement for foreigners moving in here, and Cosmo-Balkanization. Well, the “cosmo” comes from cosmopolitanism, and I think what we’re seeing because of smartphones is that people around the world have been empowered in a way that was never possible before.

And I think it’s a very interesting experiment, an anthropological science experiment that we’re all part of. Because some of the work that I do in my business, you know, they hire illegal laborers from Central and South America. And I see these guys at their lunch breaks playing with their phones, and I think it’s pretty fascinating.

What is a person from a very small impoverished town in Mexico, who’s now in Los Angeles with a smartphone. What is he getting up to? What is he looking at what? What is he exploring? What is he putting his mind into? Is it just video games or is he trying to learn history?

And then what at what websites, what news sites target first-generation, straight-out-of-the-field immigrants in 2018? What kind of information are they putting in their heads? Is it a matter of indoctrination? Is it entertainment, like Univision with the big-breasted sitcoms?

So anyway in previous generations I think you would have more humble, grateful immigrants. But now because everyone is sort of a “global citizen,” everyone’s hearing the same music, seeing the same movies, we’ve got these smartphones, yeah you just feel like, “I’m here. I can be here. I’m not going to be thankful to this new country.”

And that’s where we’re seeing politically on the news people who’ve been here for less than five, ten, fifteen, twenty years screaming in the streets about Brett Kavanaugh or “white males.” And I guess I’m trying to posit, this is how it happened. This is how it’s happening, and how it’s only going to get worse.

And people have been enabled to be ungrateful because it pushes at an agenda. Particularly politically it’s for the Democrats’ agenda. People are being enabled to be ungrateful because they’re actually pawns in a larger political game. Demographic change, electoral change. All in all, this is terrible for any country that would want to stay intact, and have a sense of identity.

You know, you watch a movie from the late 80s, even some comedy like “The Naked Gun,” and you’re just like, that world is gone. That America is completely gone. And am I allowed, is anyone allowed to lament the fact that the America of their childhood really is gone? Not just a matter of, “I was a boy and now I’m a man, and I’m sad.” No, that world is completely gone, and because I’m a “straight white male,” I’m supposed to shut up and not lament.

Anyway, the future that I see is basically more Balkanization, more special interests, more in-group preference getting a toehold politically. And then the question is, do the new groups that have power, whether it’s Somalis up in Minnesota, or maybe Ukrainians here in LA, Chinese, Korean, Mexicans everywhere… Are they going to really buy in to the principles of the Founding Fathers?

And also something I heard Luke Ford discuss with Jim Goad in an interview sometime in the last year. Luke Ford is an Australian, grew up Christian, converted to Judaism because of Dennis Prager’s radio show here in Los Angeles.

His thoughts are, Northern European culture is the only culture to put principles over tribe, because to survive those harsh winters up in Scandinavia, say, you had to agree on ideas so everyone could survive. Whereas other cultures were always getting marched on and invaded through. The Middle East, Italy, Africa. So tribal/family bonds were more important than principles and ideas.

So the question is, here in America can all these people from more tribal cultures—Asia, Latin America, Africa—can they give up those tribal/family agendas, or loyalties, and really believe in ideas and principles? And maybe that’s what the whole “living, breathing Constitution” versus “strict interpretation” comes from.

So that’s about as far as I’m gonna go with those thoughts right now. I’m very fascinated by it. I don’t know if it bodes well for the future, but you know, if we see… People are talking civil war, that’s one of the new memes, but maybe there are more nuanced changes coming up beyond just outright violence. And if you know about it, if you can if you can visualize it, maybe you can help react to it, if not influence it.

So thanks for listening. My third novel, the first book in a new series actually, is coming out in mid-October. I’ll be making some videos about that pretty soon. I’m very excited! Check my website PhilipWyeth.com subscribe to this channel.

This video can also be watched on the following platforms:
Bitchute: https://www.bitchute.com/video/LQcuN7LZ07M
OneWay: https://oneway.com/m/3419330002000
Minds: https://www.minds.com/newsfeed/893879713921372160
Brighteon: https://www.brighteon.com/5843374165001

Video was originally uploaded on October 2, 2018.

What Would You Do to Prevent a Civil War?

This is Philip Wyeth. What would you do to prevent a civil war? Would you campaign to shut down the social media accounts of your political opponents? Or would you support their right to free speech so that all ideas are debated, as well as to prevent the censored from taking their message underground in bitterness?

Would you uproot and destroy the yard signs that support candidates you aren’t voting for? What about the bumper stickers on other people’s cars? Would you throw the first punch in a verbal disagreement about politics, or walk away at the risk of being called a coward?

To prevent a civil war, would you increase immigration to drown out the voices of citizens who hold old-fashioned opinions? Or would you constrict the borders so that everyone who is already here has time to blend in together?

How would you influence elections? Would you refuse to vote, or vote twice if that’s what it took to win? Would you move to another state just for the purpose of trying to swing the vote? If so, in the case that your side still lost, would you follow through on the promise to move to another country?
To prevent a civil war, would you try to remove all reminders of the first such war that America fought? Our would you seek to learn about your country’s history, both the good and the bad?

If you’re a first or second generation immigrant living in the United States, would you thank your new country for giving you an opportunity to live in peace and thrive? Or would you side with people who obsess only about the negative aspects?

I ask these questions because I see a horizon filled with resentment, alienation, and antagonism. The momentum seems destined for more division, and ultimately large-scale violence.

Every week someone who disagrees with the Leftist agenda gets banned or shouted down by the mob. A part of me wants to see those who have been provoked too far take revenge on those who support such censorship.

But I know that righteous conflicts tend not to fulfill the fantasy or go according to plan. And there’s always some opportunistic group waiting to turn your nation’s crisis into their own gain. A hundred years ago several of the world’s greatest empires came to an end—just one decade prior and very few people would have believed it possible.

Which is why for over a year now I’ve been frantically writing books and monologues trying to offer prescient insights, rather than spending my time out at the gun range perfecting my shooting skills.

And believe me, I saw guys dialing in their scopes at the long-distance benches over a decade ago. Any Antifa uprising would not end with the triumphant bang of a Soviet hammer, but with a thud that follows the whisper of a bullet traveling a quarter mile from a hidden sniper nest.

All of this is why I want to prevent a civil war. Even though the mile markers all point to the Left thinking and behaving more and more erratically, and reacting to every news item like Pavlov’s dog with rabies.

One part of me does fear, that if the Democrats don’t take back the House in November, that the failed Blue Wave will wash up on the streets as anarchy instead.

But perhaps all these white incumbent Democrats being defeated in primaries by political upstarts, whose main qualification is simply that they are minorities, maybe that surge of color into Congress is meant to lay the groundwork for a bigger push in 2020.

In which case that election may be the pivotal moment of our generation. Defeat Trump and usher in a zero-sum era of identity politics, with increasing tribalism and mistrust across the multi-cultural landscape. I doubt schools are still teaching the distinctly American combination of civics, principles, and idealism. Because we have to throw the old dead while men out with the bathwater—as long as we still have functioning plumbing, that is.

Now, if Trump wins reelection in 2020, I predict that a hysterical battle cry will echo across the Leftist landscape, from the most privileged and self-loathing white ally to the Somali-in-America who’s fresh off the boat and already tapped into that community’s million-dollar daycare scam.

At that point we may not be asking how to prevent a civil war, but wondering what it looks like, when people who already never did any meaningful work to begin with, now decide to “go Galt”.

This video can also be watched on the following platforms:
Bitchute: https://www.bitchute.com/video/_9xnT9CvRHk
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Minds: https://www.minds.com/newsfeed/887154579687632896
Brighteon: https://www.brighteon.com/5834665797001

Video was originally uploaded on September 13, 2018.

America is Just a Place Where People Live

This is Philip Wyeth. There is a malaise in the air across America. We are a distinct personality type finding ourselves without a homeland. The time in which we grew up is over and gone, and now the land on which we were born is being razed and resculpted.

The world’s poorest and the world’s richest squeeze us from both sides. Then the mind-controlling media tell us how wonderful it is to be a taxi driver or hotel owner, using fancy terms like Uber and Airbnb.

Where are the children of Babe Ruth, Motown, Francis Ford Coppola, and classic rock lore supposed to go in an era when assimilation means the children of foreigners who skipped the line are indoctrinated by childless white Leftist professors into ingratitude and being angry at the country where they want to live?

Is America only desirable because we have toilets and electricity and mostly peaceful streets? Those of us who grew up in the 80s and 90s wanted to make ourselves great, but have been hamstrung by the complete lack of noblesse oblige by our elites.

Economic malfeasance and betrayal on every level have made saving money a losing proposition, and homeownership as a concept almost a human right, but in actuality has become an arms race leading to impossible prices.

Seventeen years of demoralizing and expensive wars all based on highly dubious allegations. The wholesale dismantling of our manufacturing base, while politicians talk on TV about supporting “working families.” Schools so out of touch that we import workers to do high-paying tech jobs.

Now a divided population is licking its chops as if some sort of internal conflict is inevitable.

Were all these policies and misadventures worth it if at the end of the day we have a device in our pocket that can play any song we want, but we cannot communicate with our next door neighbor, either because of a language or political divide?

The America I grew up in was a place that fostered me to be great. It had a distinct identity and a culture that sizzled with creative energy. Now this country is a playpen for the world’s richest to buy up real estate. We’re told it’s a “human right” for the world’s poorest to homestead in an endless stream, using any number of insidious justifications.

And yet people scratch their heads why those of us who were already here fall into despair, smoking meth, committing suicide. It’s because we have the eyes to see that in the course of just one generation the United States has ceased to be the country where an idea was protected and nurtured, to sprout wings through invention, art, freedom of thought and speech.

Now, as the melting pot begins to smell more like a chamber pot, it appears to me that America is just a place where people live. And if that’s the case, and we are told we don’t have a distinct identity like Japan or India, who will take in our mass of anachronistic spiritual refugees?

Or are we expected to quietly be marched into the ghettos of silence, because our history and opinions offend those whose own home countries have far fewer rights than the ones they twist and grandstand upon to use against us?

The phalanx of grievance and entitlement is converging upon good, everyday Americans. All we wanted to do was enjoy life and have families, but it turns out we owe the entire population of the world everything. Literally everything.

We will be hounded by government, self-loathing Leftists, sad media images to manipulate our emotions, and ultimately the Democrats’ army of imported voters.

But to even observe and make predictions is called “hate,” because our globalist overlords have a long-term plan for the world. A total-surveillance heaven without borders or war, because we’re all the same skin tone, have the same opinion, and obediently apply for a permit to purchase a kitchen knife.

But it’s all just part and parcel of being a good global citizen.

This video can also be watched on the following platforms:
Bitchute: https://www.bitchute.com/video/d8pDAQ66MeY
OneWay: https://oneway.com/m/3171128000000
Minds: https://www.minds.com/newsfeed/885966229715828736
Brighteon: https://www.brighteon.com/5833121123001

Video was originally uploaded on September 10, 2018.